On Language, the Bible, and Blog Posts

Although all humans share the creative use of language, it seems that not all of us are using it. Especially in today’s social-media saturated generation, where the ephemeral nature of conversation is touted, the art of writing well or of producing something to be read at length is vanishing. This is most alarming to writers, but also to the rest of us who still want to communicate beyond chat boxes, text messages, or the 140 characters of a tweet.

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Sonship- an Organic Theology

I wanted to say more about the organic emphasis in what’s termed sonship or adoption. If not in popular theology, at least in the Bible there is a definite emphasis placed on our growth in and experience of God’s life. As amazing as reconciliation is, the Bible itself says that there is something “much more.”

Much more we will be saved in His life, having been reconciled.  -Romans 5:10

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Greek Salad

Today marked the first post in a new category that I’m calling Greek Salad. A word of explanation is in order.

Rich in flavor yet light and with all the health benefits one could ask for in a quick lunch. An egalitarian attempt to represent the spectrum of food colors. What was once strange, unrecognizable, and picked-at became palatable and familiar. Exotic culinary parings combine to produce an exquisiteness that rallies the taste buds. This is what I think of when I think of a Greek salad.

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Begotten of God or Adopted by God?

Psalm 2:7- You are My Son; today I have begotten You.

Since taking a New Testament Greek class, I have been more interested in comparing Bible translations and their underlying Greek text. The Greek language is very expressive and often the nuances of certain words are strained through translation. Which version of the Bible you use makes a big difference, yet most Christians probably couldn’t tell you why they use a certain version.

Henry Alford in the 1800s, working to produce The Greek New Testament, said he labored for the “demolition of the unworthy and pedantic reverence for the received text, which stood in the way of all chance of discovering the genuine word of God.” That may be a harsh critique but it gets the point across.

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